Last edited by Braktilar
Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

3 edition of Ethyl-alcohol-fuel production from the Jerusalem artichoke found in the catalog.

Ethyl-alcohol-fuel production from the Jerusalem artichoke

Paul R. Middaugh

Ethyl-alcohol-fuel production from the Jerusalem artichoke

by Paul R. Middaugh

  • 233 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Fluke Institute for Renewable Energy, U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service [distributor] in Bellevue, Wash, Springfield, VA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Jerusalem artichoke,
  • Alcohol as fuel,
  • Biodiesel fuels -- Economic aspects,
  • Plant biomass -- Economic aspects,
  • Biomass energy -- Economic aspects

  • Edition Notes

    StatementPaul R. Middaugh.
    ContributionsFluke Institute for Renewable Energy., United States. Dept. of Energy.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination32 p. ;
    Number of Pages32
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17631094M
    OCLC/WorldCa76707397

    1 LB Stampede Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers (Organic) By The Pound - Early maturing - Big Tubers - Stampede Variety Sunchokes (1 Pound of Tubers) out of 5 stars $ 5 Jerusalem Artichokes Tubers for Planting By Yumheart Gardens out of 5 stars $ Reviews: Helianthus tuberosus Last modified January 4, Interest in Jerusalem artichokes extends beyond the use of this crop for food purposes. The primary interest, since the early s, has centered around the use of this crop for alcohol production as a fuel or fuel additive. Although research has shown that the Pacific Northwest is an excellent production area, economics of.

    /PRNewswire/ -- On Novem – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) No Objection Letter, for. Shop The Big Style Sale. Best Sellers.

    Jerusalem artichoke plants are grown for its edible nutritious tubers which are actually modified underground stems called ‘rhizomes’. Jerusalem artichoke tubers are high in potassium, iron, dietary fibers, niacin, thiamine, copper and phosphorus. Jerusalem artichoke plants are very easy to grow as they are very hardy plants and once roots are established on soil. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine sugars, fructo‐oligosaccharides (FOS) and inulin‐type fructans of Jerusalem artichoke tuber (JAT) powder and JAT inulin extract; (2) compare the ch.


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Ethyl-alcohol-fuel production from the Jerusalem artichoke by Paul R. Middaugh Download PDF EPUB FB2

I grew some jerusalem artichokes to try to make some alcohol and I have the book alcohol can be a gas but still have a hard time getting started on this project.

Has anybody out done this on a small scale and was able to locate needed yeasts and other materials to make it from scratch on a small scale, like five or ten gallons.

Fuel alcohol from Jerusalem artichoke. Roy M. Sachs, Clifford B. Low, Amit Vasavada Michael J. Sully, Lynn A. Williams, George C. Ziobro. From California Agriculture, September-October Tubers of this fast-growing plant could yield 25 to 30 gallons of alcohol per ton of fresh weight.

@article{osti_, title = {Production of alcohol from Jerusalem artichoke for gasoline additive. Proucavanje mogucnosti proizvodnje alkohola iz topinambura kao dodatka u benzin}, author = {Pekic, B and Kisgeci, J}, abstractNote = {Trials conducted in and on three soil types, chernozem (a rich soil), anthropogenized black sand (a medium-rich soil), and anthropogenized brown sand.

@article{osti_, title = {Alcohol production from Jerusalem artichoke using yeasts with inulinase activity}, author = {Guiraud, J P and Daurelles, J and Galzy, P}, abstractNote = {The purpose of this article is to show that yeasts with inulinase activity can be used to produce ethanol from the Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.).

The project objective is to evaluate the commercial feasibility for production of fuel alcohol by fermentation of the carbohydrates in the tops of the Jerusalem artichoke. The maximum top biomass yields of the mammoth French white variety of Jerusalem artichoke was obtained at days after plant emergence and maximum fresh weight of the tops.

Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke tubers were conducted batchwise at 30°C using Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ethanol concentrations obtained were % (v/v) from the ground tubers after 15 h, % from the juice concentrate after 72 h, and % from the flour after h.

American and European gardeners have been selecting superior strains over the course of years growing Jerusalem artichokes. A few of these are distinctive enough to bear variety names.

Jerusalem artichoke tubers also contain thiamin, pyridoxine vitamin B complex vitamins, pnathothenic acid, folates, and riboflavin. Sunchokes may help reduce blood pressure thanks to a potentially countering effect on the sodium that is consumed into the body via the food we eat.

Back in the 70's and 80's Helianthus tuberosa was considered a serious energy crop. Seemed to make some sense then. High production per acre which could be harvested every year or every other year and automatically replant itself from the many bits of tuber left in the soil after harvest.

It would then be fermented, turned in alcohol (fuel) and used to transport and work. The globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.), usually just called “artichoke,” originated in the Mediterranean herbaceous, thistle-like plant is produced for its immature, edible flower buds.

The thorny green globe-shaped vegetable was first brought to the United States in the s, where it was grown in Louisiana by French settlers and in California by Spanish immigrants. Pramod K. Bajpai and Pratima Bajpai, Cultivation and utilization of Jerusalem artichoke for ethanol, single cell protein, and high-fructose syrup production.

Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) (JA) is a plant native to temperate North America, and has been advocated for many years to be a possible feedstock for bioethanol production (Bajpai and Bajpai,Bajpai and Margaritis,Guo et al.,Margaritis et al.,Nakamura et al., ).

It is characterized by high. Jerusalem artichoke also has potential for production of ethanol fuel, using inulin-adapted strains of yeast for fermentation. The tubers are used for cooking and baking in same ways in as potatoes: but unlike the potato they can also be eaten raw.

Bryan Tungland, in Human Microbiota in Health and Disease, Potential adverse effects of Jerusalem artichoke plant parts. Jerusalem artichoke tubers have a long history of human consumption, and the plant’s green matter has a long history as animal food.

A review of the literature for potential toxic compounds in Jerusalem artichoke plant, Helianthus tuberosus, showed that the.

Jerusalem Artichokes: Health Benefits & Nutritional Properties. The Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus), native to eastern North America, belongs to the sunflower family of known as the earth apple, sunchoke, sunroot and topinambour, the Jerusalem artichoke is a healthy root vegetable cultivated for its highly nutritious and fleshy tuber.

Innear the end of America’s second post-World War II energy crisis, and at the onset of the nations most recent farm crisis, American Energy Farming Systems began to sell and distribute what it deemed a “providential plant” destined to be a new and saving crop—the Jerusalem Artichoke.

This volume recounts this story of the bizarre intersection of evangelical Christianity, a. Fermentation conditions were optimized for the production of ethanol from Jerusalem artichoke with a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae able to use high-concentration juice and undiluted pulp.

Yields (95 to g ethanol/l=85 to 98% of the theoretical value) exceeded. The artichoke is a perennial thistle that originated in the Mediterranean. The artichoke is technically a flower bud that has not yet bloomed. The first mention of artichokes in literature was around AD in The Greek Herbal of Dioscorides, a book on the medicinal uses of plants.

The Greeks and Romans considered them to be an aphrodisiac. Artichoke seeds were found during. InHendrickson started promoting Jerusalem artichokes, a cousin to sunflowers, growing 10 feet tall with tuber-like roots that he thought showed promise for alcohol production.

Jerusalem Artichoke: Production and Marketing - Kindle edition by Ciju, Roby Jose. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Jerusalem Artichoke: Production and s: 4.

Web exclusive posted March 2,at a.m. CST The Institute for Sustainable and Renewable Resources, in Danville, Va., is studying the potential to use the Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosis), a perennial native sunflower species, as a feedstock for producing ethanol.

The institute is a research center jointly affiliated with the departments of horticulture and forestry at.From this point of view, Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) is certainly a species worthy of remark since it has all the attributes to accomplish the aims of the updated EU Renewable Energy Directive (RED II).

Starting from physiological aspects, the present review examines and summarizes literature on the ecology, genetic resources.Timmons says using Jerusalem artichoke in cattle feed can reduce the cow's methane production, which is a source of greenhouse gases.

"I think it has tremendous potential for solving a lot of environmental problems, health problems, as far as livestock goes, and it produces more per acre [than other feed crops]," he says.